http://d5media.co.uk Tue, 10 Feb 2015 18:57:43 +0000 en-US hourly 1 Design Trends: Neo Materialism http://d5media.co.uk/design-trends/design-trends-keep-eye/ http://d5media.co.uk/design-trends/design-trends-keep-eye/#comments Fri, 06 Sep 2013 08:48:21 +0000 http://d5media.co.uk/?p=10661 The D5 Graphic Design Blog. The future is a well kept secret. In design direction, creative analysts and futurologists predict, with a great deal of accuracy what will be ‘on trend’ for the coming years. But if you really dig deep, you realise, as designers, we’re carving our own paths. Let’s take S/S 2015′s biggest […]

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The D5 Graphic Design Blog.
The future is a well kept secret. In design direction, creative analysts and futurologists predict, with a great deal of accuracy what will be ‘on trend’ for the coming years. But if you really dig deep, you realise, as designers, we’re carving our own paths. Let’s take S/S 2015′s biggest emerging macro-trend and compare it to the work being produced by emerging designers.

Neo-Materialism.

“Over the last four decades we have witnessed dematerialisation in various fields: money became credit, brand names became more important than products, art became concept, and our lives moved, at least partially, online. We are now witnessing a growing interest in “thingness” (a term referring to objects that have physical presence, create an emotional response and have a connection to the place they were made). Artists, designers and consumers are seeking a more tangible appreciation of the world around them.” -WGSN

So in layman’s terms, not necessarily a shift from digital design to real world objects but certainly a ‘look and feel’ that represents this. We will be seeing more ‘real-world’ design but digital design will also look more ‘realistic’.

What we will generally see in design:

  • - A shift from regimented boxes and grids to more organic forms.
  • - Hand-drawn illustrative work, intentional mistakes, uncensored humanisms.
  • - An attention to hyper-real detail.

In print design:

  • - Tangible, playful items, textured surfaces and folding things will invite us to fiddle.
  • - Finally, stock imagery that isn’t corporate, we’ll see emotion, nature and detail.
  • - Traditional print shops and boutique printing services will firmly stand their ground.

In digital design:

  • - HDR imagery of the natural world, real life but better.
  • - Intuitive interaction, technology becomes an extension of the human process.
  • - A celebration of the symmetry in nature rather than the perfection achieved with technology.

Online design:

  • - An acknowledgement of the true nature of the end user, a human, not a machine.
  • - Natures imperfections will creep onto the web.
  • - Natural effects of science will become more popular, i.e. parallax, inertia & fluid layout.

Other universal themes, not just in design:

  • - An increased interest in the art of story telling.
  • - Narratives and themes that revolve around the idea of exploration.
  • - A shift in the perception of the future from the space age to a new tribal age.

This may all sound like outlandish claims based around a single theme but futurologists didn’t just pluck these ideas out of thin air. They looked at popular emerging themes of great newly surfacing designers as well as some established innovators…

In 2012 Universal Everything created “Made by Humans”, an installation piece where human movements influenced a digital output. This year, the photographer Janne Parviainen has published a set of images painted with LED’s, we’re starting to see the connection here, right? The blurring of lines between the digital and organic worlds…

Design Trends Neo Materialism Light Paintings 2

 

Design Trends Neo Materialism Light Paintings 3

 

Design Trends Neo Materialism Light Paintings

 

Emerging Designers.

Here are some designers I think are really influencing the emergence of Neo Materialism. This is not to say they’re doing it consciously or are part of some bigger agenda. Their work is simply brilliant and inspiring others to work in similar ways, tackling similar subjects.

Depthcore Collective:

Perhaps exploring the darker side of the natural world in digital design, Depthcore’s artists tend to work with intense CGI imagery, but their latest ‘chapter’; ‘Primal‘ explores that new aesthetic of the future I was talking about, combine that with their signature HDR style and an exceptional attention to detail and this is what you get:

Design Trends Neo Materialism Depthcore Collective 1

Design Trends Neo Materialism Depthcore Collective 2

Design Trends Neo Materialism Depthcore Collective 3

 

Piotr Tarka

Continuing the HDR / CGI theme, Tarka uses 3d rendering software to produce these tangible pieces of design, the subject isn’t necessarily always an organic one but even material objects take on an organic form. These images certainly invite us to reach into the screen and grab the typically energetic objects. Even in Tarka’s digital discipline, we see a definate ‘hyper-realism’.

Design Trends Neo Materialism Tarka 1

Design Trends Neo Materialism Tarka 2

Design Trends Neo Materialism Tarka 3

Chris Labrooy

Again with the CGI, Chris Labrooy creates typically typographic posters with a definite hyper-realism factor. Note the fluid, liquid forms, the stickiness, the visible physics of the imagery and the energy portrayed through the notion of capturing a still moment from what looks like what could be a moving image.

Design Trends Neo Materialism labrooy 2

 

Design Trends Neo Materialism labrooy 3

 

Design Trends Neo Materialism labrooy

 

I realise the imagery I’ve shown in this article very much revolves around the digital realm, but don’t forget we’re talking about a trend set to emerge in 2015 here, these are but the fundamental roots of what will be a trend that dominates everything from design to fashion, film and TV to technology and product design to architecture.

Trend analysis plays a very important role in the design process, large corporations pay huge sums of money to futurologists and specialist analysts but designers by no means need these services, we’re the ones providing the data from which these predictions are made, a truly critical and intuitive practice is always the best start when attempting to achieve the latest ‘on-trend’ aesthetic.

 

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Influential designers who should have made the list http://d5media.co.uk/graphic-design/most-influential-designers/influential-designers-list/ http://d5media.co.uk/graphic-design/most-influential-designers/influential-designers-list/#comments Thu, 29 Aug 2013 16:03:29 +0000 http://d5media.co.uk/?p=10599 The D5 Graphic Design Blog This is a quick follow up article to a ten part blog series entitled ‘Most Influential Designers’, if you’re looking to start from the beginning, go here. The series was based on the 50th anniversary survey published by GDUSA which featured a top ten list of the most influential graphic designers working today (amongst […]

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The D5 Graphic Design Blog
This is a quick follow up article to a ten part blog series entitled ‘Most Influential Designers’, if you’re looking to start from the beginning, go here. The series was based on the 50th anniversary survey published by GDUSA which featured a top ten list of the most influential graphic designers working today (amongst other creative professions).The purpose of the series was to work in reverse order through each influential designer and establish just what it was that made them so great, outlining their road to success and analysing their greatest works. This week, we’re going to look at some designers who I personally feel should have made the list or at least would sit in my own list of designers who influence me.

Jessica Walsh

Being our #1 influential designer; Stefan Sagmeister’s partner is but one string on Jessica Walsh’s bow. Becoming a partner at a leading graphic design studio at just 25 is a a massive achievement and it doesn’t just happen overnight. Her work is outstandingly visceral, bold, recognisable and beautiful. Jessica has worked at Pentagram and Print Magazine, also hugely influential design positions, her work has accumulated more appreciations than I’ve ever seen on Behance and she has made international news with her latest project.

Like Sagmeister, Jessica Walsh is incredibly open about her work and personal life, she’s clearly achieving that same ‘self-branding’ thing Stefan has built for himself, whether on purpose or not, it’s genius. Jessica is quickly becoming, in my mind, not only the pin up girl of modern graphic design but one of the best new creative minds. But perhaps that’s just me, I was totally shocked to find that Jessica doesn’t even have a Wikipedia entry. Maybe I’ve spent too much time looking at her work and reading every article and interview that I’ve built her up to be more well-known than she really is. Anyway, none of that really matters, let’s look at some of her work:

 Influential Designers Jessica Walsh 5 D5 Media

Influential Designers Jessica Walsh 4 D5 Media

Influential Designers Jessica Walsh 3 D5 Media

Influential Designers Jessica Walsh 2 D5 Media

Influential Designers Jessica Walsh 1 D5 Media

 

Noma Bar

In the history of graphic design we looked at old masters such as Alexey Brodovitch, the master of white space, Armin Hoffman and Joseph Müller Brockman who all used negative space to their advantage. If those guys were the old masters Noma Bar is certainly the new master. His influence is everywhere, I mean, how many bootleg ‘minimalist’ movie posters are cropping up all over the place? There seems to be a little corner of the internet that’s totally obsessed with this style. But none, I mean none, match the stylishness and visual quality carried by the negative space design of Noma Bar.

Graphic Design is all about efficient communication right? Well if a regular picture can tell a thousand words, Bar could write an entire novel with a rectangle. The Israeli born illustrator, designer and published artist now works as part of the Dutch Uncle collective of illustrators, he has produced over 500 works in this style and continues to do so. His work has been featured in Time Out London, BBC, Random House, The Observer, The Economist and Wallpaper*. Bar has published 2 books featuring his work and about his design techniques. Check it out:

Influential Designers Noma Bar 2 D5 Media

Influential Designers Noma Bar 4 D5 Media

Influential Designers Noma Bar 3 D5 Media

Influential Designers Noma Bar 2 D5 Media

Influential Designers Noma Bar 1 D5 Media

 

Mathias Augustyniak and Michael Amzalag

I can understand that Jessica Walsh and Noma Bar may only be 2 of the biggest names for me personally and not in the worlds eye. Therefore not included in GDUSA’s top ten list of the most influential graphic designers working today. But I cannot begin to comprehend why Mathias Augustyniak nor Michael Amzalag weren’t included, not even in the names of designers who ‘almost made the list’. I recently wrote about Mathias Augustyniak nor Michael Amzalag AKA M/M Paris when they won a grammy for their music packaging work for Björk’s Biophilia album. An achievement that kickstarted Sagmeister’s career. M/M Paris certainly don’t need a kickstart however, they’ve been working for almost 21 years as M/M, which, to me, is Europe’s most influential studio. I mean, come on, they had an exhibition in London of all their best works embroidered into carpets. Anyway, here’s some work:


Influential Designers MM Paris 4 D5 Media

Influential Designers MM Paris 3 D5 Media

Influential Designers MM Paris 1 D5 Media

Influential Designers MM Paris 1 D5 Media

 

Influential Designers MM Paris 5 D5 Media

Jonathan Puckey

Design innovation is often more important than design itself. For example, where would modernism and the international style be without Helvetica? Where would Jonathan Ive be without the technical innovations of Apple? The new digital aesthetic is a key trend this year, we’re becoming more and more obsessed with technology, the internet, it’s glitches and short-fallings.  One of the styles greatest innovators is Jonathan Puckey, a hybrid designer and design tool developer. His influence can be seen in even the work of our most influential designer. Just compare the results of processing an image through Puckey’s Delaunay Raster  tool to Sagmeister’s Aishti identity and Casa Da Musica projects. I cant say for sure whether or not this resemblance is a direct result of Puckeys influence or a more organic ‘trend’ based influence but Puckey, for me anyway, certainly resembles a figurehead of NDA.

Influential Designers Jonathan Puckey 5 D5 Media Influential Designers Jonathan Puckey 4 D5 Media Influential Designers Jonathan Puckey 3 D5 Media Influential Designers Jonathan Puckey 2 D5 Media Influential Designers Jonathan Puckey 1 D5 Media

Apparantly, when he lectured at Yale, they forgot to make him a poster, Hitler was angry:

 

Next week; enough with these inspiring designers, what about some inspired young guns?

 

 

 

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Most influential designers; Stefan Sagmeister http://d5media.co.uk/graphic-design/most-influential-designers-stefan-sagmeister/ http://d5media.co.uk/graphic-design/most-influential-designers-stefan-sagmeister/#comments Fri, 23 Aug 2013 15:32:01 +0000 http://d5media.co.uk/?p=10296 The D5 Graphic Design Blog This is the final part of a ten part blog series, if you’re looking to start from the beginning, go here. As part of their 50th anniversary survey GDUSA published a top ten list of the most influential graphic designers working today (amongst other creative professions). I’m going to work, in reverse order, through these […]

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The D5 Graphic Design Blog
This is the final part of a ten part blog series, if you’re looking to start from the beginning, go here. As part of their 50th anniversary survey GDUSA published a top ten list of the most influential graphic designers working today (amongst other creative professions). I’m going to work, in reverse order, through these top ten designers and establish just what it is that makes them so damn great and more importantly display some of their best works.

#1 Stefan Sagmeister

In a total contrast to our eighth part and number 3 on the list, I’ll have to try my best not to let my love for Stefan’s work obscure meaning and remain unbiased with view to presenting a fair and clear picture of the Sagmeister success story.

Stefan is a designer, studio director, entrepreneur, artist, typographer, published author, educator and all round art and design hero. According to the internet, the Austrian born designer started his career at the tender age of fifteen, whether or not we can trust this statement is sketchy at best. In fact in his TED Talk ‘The Power of Time Off’ (below) Sagmeister describes his working career as starting at 25. Stefan certainly however had a keen interest in design from an early age. This early participation in the industry at Alphorn, an Austrian magazine for young people, will have surely laid the path for the successful academic pursuits that followed. Unfortunately, this did not happen immediately, his first application at undergraduate level to The University of Applied Arts, Vienna was rejected.

“just about everybody was better at drawing than I was”

He enrolled in a local private school and was later accepted at the University. During this time Stefan worked on posters for Schauspielhaus theatre group as part of the Gruppe Gut collective. His style at the time did not represent his current methods, humour, nudity and borderline inappropriateness weren’t present until he moved to New York due to  receiving a Fulbright Scholarship based on the merits of his work enabling him to continue his study at the Pratt Institute in Brooklyn. Sagmeister, in this period, famously designed business cards ‘that cost only a dollar’ as they were printed on a one dollar bill.

Austria, at the time, and still is, one of the few European countries with a mandatory military conscription. Typically among the art and design world, Stefan was objectionable toward this idea and managed to serve his time contributing toward community work in a refugee camp near Vienna. Following this period Sagmeister stayed in Vienna working as a graphic designer.

In ’91 Stefan moved to Hong Kong to work with Leo Burnett, the ad agency were looking for a typographer at the time:

“So I made up a high number and said I would do it for that.”

In ’92 Stefan famously designed a poster for ’4As Advertising Awards Ceremony’, the poster featured a traditional Chinese image with four men showing their behinds. Stirring significant controversy with some ad agencies even pulling out of the ceremony entirely, Stefan’s favourite complaint read:

“Who’s the asshole who designed this poster?”

4as

In ’93 Sagmeister decided to move to Sri Lanka and work from a beach hut, this only lasted two months before the design-magnetic-field of New York City got the better of him and pulled him back, half way around the world.

As a student, Stefan had greatly admired the work of Tibor Kalman and subsequently had a great ambition to work at M&Co, Tibor’s world famous studio. Stefan bombarded the company with calls and correspondence until they’d support his visa application. Interestingly here, Sagmeisters first project was to design an invitation for a gay and lesbian task-force gala. He designed a large basket of fruit which notoriously caused M&Co staff a huge headache attempting to prevent the thing from rotting. Perhaps an early incarnation of the idea for his ‘Self Confidence Produces Fine Results’ piece which Sagmeister fans will no doubt be familiar with. M&Co was closed just two months later when Tibor moved to Rome to work exclusively on Colors magazine.

bananawall_1_1800_1114_75

sagmeisteropennaked

Stefan Sagmeister founded Sagmeister, inc. Kalman had advised he keep his company small, just Stefan, a designer and an intern. A principle, though not to such an extreme, Stefan still swears by. In the early days Sagmeister had intended to exclusively work on design for music projects and more specifically, for music he liked. However, any designer, freelancer or creative professional reading this will know, we don’t always get what we want when it comes to these things. His second project following branding his own company was branding his brothers company, an austrian jeans label named ‘blue’. Sagmeister, of course, designed a black and orange logo.

Unsuccessful in seeking his desired work through traditional sourcing avenues, Stefan settled for designing the cover for his friends album. ‘Mountains of Madness’ by H.P Zinker. The album went on to win the first of Stefan’s 4 grammy nominations, it featured a picture of a depressed looking man but when the red transparent sleeve was removed, the image became a detailed green and red image of the same man screaming. The concept was inspired after Sagmeister spotted a young dyslexic girl using a transparent red sheet to assist her with reading her maths textbook. A similar concept was later featured on the Peter Hall book ‘Made You Look’ about and designed by Sagmeister.

HP Zinker - Mountains of Madness

madeyoulook_1_1_1800_1114_75

madeyoulookWinning a grammy for album packaging design is a sure fire way to open the floodgates to some very exciting music based design projects, Stefan had really hit the nail on the head with the Mountains of Madness cover, in times that were seeing the changeover from the brilliant art platform that was vinyl to the toy like plastic-y ugliness of CD. The following years are undeniable proof of this with clients like Lou Reed, David Byrne and The Rolling Stones knocking at the door.

DavidByrne1_1800_1114_75

RollingStones2_1800_1114_75

LouReedSince these works, as one can imagine, Sagmeister, inc. went from strength to strength. He did not stick entirely to his mission statement of only producing work for music that he liked but that is not to say he’s not picking and choosing his projects. Almost everything Stefan Sagmeister works on is, in my opinion, a brilliant project, not just from a design perspective but from artistic, environmental, economical and social perspectives. His website states:

“We want the product or service to be worthwhile, i.e., have a reason to exist. …. We want to work with kind people.”

It’s clear that Sagmeister, inc. has stuck to these business philosophies, small studio, honest and good work. Not that there haven’t been points in which Stefan has felt otherwise, he writes in his diary:

“I have done enough bullshit lately, I just have to make time for something better. Something good.”

Since Mountains of Madness, Lou Reed, David Byrne and The Rolling Stones Sagmeister has worked commercially, on personal and cultural projects for clients including: Aishti Department Stores, Levis, HBO Studio productions, Toto, AutoDesk, Adobe, BBH ad agency, Publicis ad agency, IDEO, Red Bull, BMW, Institute of Contemporary Art Philadelphia, Guggenheim Museum, Casa da Musica, NYC, Olympic committee, Museum of Modern Art, AIGA, Random House Publishing, Seed Magazine, The New York Times, .copy Magazine, NYTimes Magazine, Columbia University, School of Visual Arts, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Rhode Island School of Design, Lou Reed/Sister Ray Enterprise, Universal Music/Jay-Z, Warner Brothers Records Inc, Atlantic Records, Rhino Records, David Byrne/Brian Eno, Capitol records, One Voice and Azuero Earth Project.

A massive contributory factor to Sagmeister’s success however are his personal projects, they let us, his audience have a deep insight into his mind. Sure a great designer will express some of their own opnions and ideas through all of their work, but most don’t really open up in the same way that Sagmeister does. His ‘Things I have Learned in My Life So Far’ series and the book by Peter Hall, subtitled ‘Made You Look’ containing dozens of exerts from Stefan’s diary are incredibly honest, open and transparent.

For further reading; his books, especially ‘Made You Look’ are an exceptional start.

Another unusual ingredient in the way in which Sagmeister works is his theory on sabbaticals. In the below video he talks about how he has decided to divide his first five years of retirement into 5, 1 year long periods in which the studio closes its doors to commercial work and Sagmeister and his colleagues go to outreached areas of the world to work on personally fulfilling projects.

SagmeisterandWalshNaked

Recently Sagmeister, inc. has evolved. Having acquired a new professional partner, Jessica Walsh, the company became Sagmeister & Walsh. More about Jessie next week in the blog post ‘People Who Should Have Been Included in the Top Ten Most Influential Designers.’

Let’s take a look at some work.

Vilcek3_1_1800_1114_75TIL30_1_1800_1114_75TIL6_1_1800_1114_75 TIL3_1_1800_1114_75SW_ABickerton_1_1800_1114_75SW_ABickerton_4_1800_1114_75StoryStore5_1_1800_1114_75StoryStore2_1_1800_1114_75StandardCharter8_1_1800_1114_75 StandardCharter6_1_1800_1114_75SkeletonKeygravityCD_1_1800_1114_75SevenDeadlySins6_1800_1114_75 SevenDeadlySins1_1800_1114_75RollingStones5_1800_1114_75 RollingStones3_1800_1114_75Public_ALT_LORES_1800_1114_75PatTrio_1_1800_1114_75 Oubey3_1800_1114_75NVN_spread_persp_7_1_1800_1114_75 Obsessions1_1800_1114_75 Obsessions2_1800_1114_75 NewViennaNow_1_1_1800_1114_75 NewRepublicAmpersand_1800_1114_75_1800_1114_75madeyoulook_6_1_1800_1114_75 madeyoulook_7_1_1800_1114_75HappyShow3_1800_1114_75HalftoneSatisfaction10_1800_1114_75Elevator7_1800_1114_75 Elevator3_1800_1114_75EDP2_2_1800_1114_75DrugsAreFun5_1800_1114_75DrugsAreFun1_1800_1114_75DeitchWall_2_1800_1114_75CompassTable3_1800_1114_75 DarwinChair3_1800_1114_75casadamusica3_1_1800_1114_75 casadamusica4_1_1800_1114_75 casadamusica7_1_1800_1114_75Brian-eno-and-David-Byrne_20_1800_1114_75 bananawall_6_1800_1114_75 BikeNeonSign_1800_1114_75 BikeNeonSign4_1800_1114_75bananawall_2_1800_1114_75AnnualPhotography1_1_1800_1114_75 AizoneIdentity1_1800_1114_75Aizone9_1_1800_1114_75 Aizone5_1_1800_1114_75 Aizone4_1_1800_1114_75 Aizone3_1_1800_1114_75 Aizone2_1_1800_1114_75AishtiIdentity7_1800_1114_75 Aizone_FW13_GoGoGo_1500_1064_75Aizone_FW13_SoItGoes_1500_1064_75 Aizone-11_1800_1114_75 AishtiIdentity6_1800_1114_75Adobe_ALT_LORES_1800_1114_75 AIGnewOrleans_LORES_1800_1114_75Abstract10_11_5_1800_1114_75Abstract-1011_9_1800_1114_75 120412_Portfolio_ALBUM_026_1800_1114_75_1800_1114_75

 

Sagmesiter’s work clearly has a definitive style, having said this each work is vastly distinguishable, a designers dream quality to say the least. He enjoys his work, is very opinionated on the field of graphic design and openly embraces every aspect of his life and the world around him in his work, he is open, honest and human. We see his mistakes, his low points as well as the astonishing highs of his works. It’s difficult to pinpoint just one element that is responsible for his success, but if I had to pick one it would be the persona that is Sagmeister, I’ve never met Stefan, but I feel as though I know him inside out, my idea of him maybe entirely wrong but his greatest design achievement isn’t that of music packaging, nor a great poster, it’s branding. Branding himself.

From what we’ve seen it’s clear that Sagmeister inspires me. I’ve tried not to let this taint the information provided but in an attempt to balance the scales I’ll include some quotes from less impressed individuals.

“I am appalled at your inclusion of Stefan Sagmeister’s work. The design community bears a certain responsibility, our society is already on the road to depravity” – Letter to the editor, Graphis.

“Disgusting” – South China Morning Post.

Next week: People who should have been included in the top ten list of most influential graphic designers.

 

 

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Most influential designers; Paula Scher http://d5media.co.uk/graphic-design/most-influential-designers-paula-scher/ http://d5media.co.uk/graphic-design/most-influential-designers-paula-scher/#comments Wed, 24 Jul 2013 14:56:29 +0000 http://d5media.co.uk/?p=10263 The D5 Graphic Design Blog This is the ninth part of a ten part blog series, if you’re looking to start from the beginning, go here. As part of their 50th anniversary survey GDUSA published a top ten list of the most influential graphic designers working today (amongst other creative professions). I’m going to work, in reverse order, through these […]

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The D5 Graphic Design Blog
This is the ninth part of a ten part blog series, if you’re looking to start from the beginning, go here. As part of their 50th anniversary survey GDUSA published a top ten list of the most influential graphic designers working today (amongst other creative professions). I’m going to work, in reverse order, through these top ten designers and establish just what it is that makes them so damn great and more importantly display some of their best works.

#2 Paula Scher

The only lady graphic designer to appear on this list and another New Yorker, Paula Scher, principle partner at Pentagram, one of the worlds leading and according to this list, the most inspirational design firm.

Paula Scher began her working career after graduating Tyler School of Art with a bachelors degree in illustration. She moved to New York City to look for work and began her first job as a layout artist for Random House children’s book division. After 2 years she obtained her first significant role at CBS Records (now Sony). At CBS Paula would churn out over 150 album covers a year, Paula herself admits that ’90% of them were bad’ which she goes on to explain was a good experience.

Wikipedia lists some of the most successful album cover designs she created during this time: Boston (Boston), Eric Gale (Ginseng Woman), Leonard Bernstein (Poulenc Stranvinsky), Bob James (H), Bob James and Earl Klugh (One on One), Roger Dean and David Howells (The Ultimate Album Cover Album) and Jean-Pierre Rampal and Lily Laskin (Sakura: Japanese Melodies for Flute and Harp).

In 1982, Scher left CBS to work on her own graphic design projects and in 1984 she partnered up with fellow Tyler graduate Terry Koppel to form Koppel & Scher. During the six years of their partnership, she produced identities, packaging, book jackets, and advertising, including the famous Swatch poster based on previous work by Swiss designer Herbert Matter.

In 1991 Scher joined Pentagram as a partner, here she has created some of her most iconic works. Scher’s work is recognisable, mostly, by it emphasis on and style of typography. Often, I would say, misplaced in the category of Post-Modernism. Scher herself, describes this distinguishing feature of her work to be influenced by her environment. New York City is tall, big, loud and in your face, elements present in almost all of her distinguishing works. However contradictory to those who would put Paula in the design school of Post-Modernism, her work mostly makes use of grid-systems, a principle outlined by Modernist legend Joseph Müller-Brockman and focusses heavily on direct and clear communication of an idea or theme. The Post-Modernists rejected the clean, simplistic over use of Helvetica and the corporate ‘big-wiggery’ of the United States at the time. Paula supports this, claiming that Helvetica and the corporate style of design was the face of the Vietnam war, of which Paula was very much against. Having started in the early 70′s, Scher’s creative career has lived through the Post-Modernism age, her work contains elements that could be argued to be within that genre but ultimately, it transcends its boundaries. Some describe the period of art and design were currently in as ‘Neo-Modernism’ and Scher’s work certainly resembles some of the ideals of that category. She uses elements of playfulness and expressive type but does not allow it to obscure or conflict with the message. Her work in my opinion is a logical creative progression of the field that embraces it’s own history and respects current trends.

ballet-tech-3 citi  highline noise-funk paula scher nycb poster paula scher pub theatre paula scherpublic-theatre2 paula_scher_04 Paula-Scher-interview-designboom-02 Paula-Scher-interview-designboom-03 Paula-Scher-interview-designboom-04 Paula-Scher-interview-designboom-05 Paula-Scher-interview-designboom-06 Paula-Scher-interview-designboom-07 Paula-Scher-interview-designboom-09 public  windows8

 

 

Next week, the final instalment of this blog series, Stefan Sagmeister.

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Most influential designers; David Carson http://d5media.co.uk/graphic-design/most-influential-designers-david-carson/ http://d5media.co.uk/graphic-design/most-influential-designers-david-carson/#comments Sun, 14 Jul 2013 11:55:08 +0000 http://d5media.co.uk/?p=10226 The D5 Graphic Design Blog This is the eighth part of a ten part blog series, if you’re looking to start from the beginning, go here. As part of their 50th anniversary survey GDUSA published a top ten list of the most influential graphic designers working today (amongst other creative professions). I’m going to work, in reverse order, through these […]

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The D5 Graphic Design Blog
This is the eighth part of a ten part blog series, if you’re looking to start from the beginning, go here. As part of their 50th anniversary survey GDUSA published a top ten list of the most influential graphic designers working today (amongst other creative professions). I’m going to work, in reverse order, through these top ten designers and establish just what it is that makes them so damn great and more importantly display some of their best works.

#3 David Carson

As a spokesperson and figurehead of post-modernism, I couldn’t feel less empathetic with the life works and career of David Carson, that said, I’ll try to set aside my biases and explain his influence on modern graphic design. Essentially Carson’s graphic persona is the antagonist to the modernist designer’s protagonist, it might resemble the complete opposite in terms of style, application and methodology but, in my opinion, it provides a sort of necessary evil of which any logical designer should respect and be very much aware of. Carson’s output is often predictably unpredictable, illogically logical, organised chaos.

Carson was born in Texas and graduated from San Diego State University with a degree in Sociology, after that he became the 9th best surfer in the world (1989) and worked in a high school as a teacher. Certainly not the typical path into design. He did, in 1980, study a two week course in design at the University of Arizona and in ’83 attended Oregon College of Commercial Art where he began to experiment with design.

Carson made his name in design through skateboarding, surfing and snowboarding magazines during the 80′s. The most notable of which include, Transworld Skateboarding, Spinoff and Transworld Snowboarding. In this stint of 80′s extreme sports magazines Carson coined and developed his grungey typographic style, often obscuring and distorting letterforms and pictorial elements to make the output intentionally illegible.

While these magazines made his work known in the communities they involved as well as niche corners of the creative industries, it wasn’t until publisher Marvin Scott Jarrett commissioned Carson to design Ray Gun, an alternative music and lifestyle magazine that debuted in 1992. Ray Gun made Carson well known and attracted new admirers to his work. In this period, he was featured in publications such as The New York Times (May 1994) and Newsweek (1996).

During his time at Ray Gun Carson famously set an entire article in the Dingbats font, the article was entirely un-readable. Personally, I find this to be a complete train-wreck of a gimmick, the sort that would be thought up by an ageing ad man, running really low on ideas, but that’s just me. Ray Gun’s editors put a read-able version in the back of the magazine too, so what was the point, really? Sorry, I’m trying to indifferent, honest.

Carson left Ray Gun in ’95 and founded ‘David Carson Design’, in NYC. His Ray Gun shenanigans attracted a whole host of clients including: Pepsi Cola, Ray Ban, Nike, Microsoft, Budweiser, Giorgio Armani, NBC, American Airlines and Levi Strauss. In 2000, Carson closed his New York City studio and followed his children to Charleston, South Carolina, where their mother had relocated them.

Since then, he’s worked as the Creative Director of the Gibbes Museum of Art in Charleston and directed a television commercial for UMPQUA Bank in Seattle, Washington among other freelance projects.

Today, Carson lectures, teaches and holds workshops.

On the one hand, graphic design is a form of communication and devoting your career to obscuring the medium seems counter-productive and even offensive to those that believe in such ideals. On the other hand, graphic design is an art form, which is notoriously shaped by the underground and avant-garde, often taking extremism and the obscure to change its shape and appearance.

Design writer Steven Heller has said,

“He significantly influenced a generation to embrace typography as an expressive medium”.

Carson’s work is of a definite style, that we cannot deny, it is unique, exciting, colourful and vibrant. It has it’s place in the history of design and defines an era. Which is undoubtedly what led to his inclusion in the list. Carson’s outputs are often great, attractive pieces of design, for me, the problem is, they always communicate the same message; chaos, a message inappropriate for much of the work produced. That said, the grunge and chaos does now have its place, without designers like Carson and the people he’s influenced, those messages may have been communicated very differently.

To hopefully balance out my inevitable cynicism when discussing Carson, I’ll quote a supporter of his when describing his work, get ready for some bold claims:

Legend is a term that is all too often abused when describing a successful individual, but in the case of graphic designer David Carson, it’s just one of many superlatives you could use: Innovator, pioneer, groundbreaker, game changer – Carson deserves them all. Through his seminal, groundbreaking work for Ray Gun magazine during the ’90s, Carson single-handedly shook up the world of graphic design – often placing more importance on the visual composition of the pages than on the text itself. He was never far from controversy, upsetting the purists with his unorthodox approach – once finding an interview with Bryan Ferry so boring that he used dingbat for the entire piece. Such is Carson’s legacy (and he’s long way from being done, yet), that everywhere you go you can see his influence – whether it’s on the front cover of a mainstream or indie publication orin the opening credits of a mainstream film. Without doubt, David Carson’s work will be here long after the talented surfer(yes, he surfs, too) has rode his last wave.

 

1_2 42d audi1 blue_cover359 dali_11 dali-red-logo DavidCarsonWork ei2 emporioarmanimag et1 fragile291 hamlet_a0 hamlet2 lwl5 nin_live_dvd pacifika_s rg8 YES__2-7-d

Next week, Paula Scher. Lady principle at Pentagram.

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Most influential designers; Milton Glaser http://d5media.co.uk/graphic-design/most-influential-designers-milton-glaser/ http://d5media.co.uk/graphic-design/most-influential-designers-milton-glaser/#comments Fri, 12 Jul 2013 14:56:16 +0000 http://d5media.co.uk/?p=10195 The D5 Graphic Design Blog This is the seventh part of a ten part blog series, if you’re looking to start from the beginning, go here. As part of their 50th anniversary survey GDUSA published a top ten list of the most influential graphic designers working today (amongst other creative professions). I’m going to work, in reverse order, through these […]

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The D5 Graphic Design Blog
This is the seventh part of a ten part blog series, if you’re looking to start from the beginning, go here. As part of their 50th anniversary survey GDUSA published a top ten list of the most influential graphic designers working today (amongst other creative professions). I’m going to work, in reverse order, through these top ten designers and establish just what it is that makes them so damn great and more importantly display some of their best works.

#4 Milton Glaser

Many experts promote the idea that Glaser personifies American graphic design, his influence and grandeur is immeasurably huge. His work has not only been celebrated in world renowned national galleries such as the Pompidou in Paris and New York’s MoMA, he has had entire exhibition halls designated for his work, some of his work, even,  forever resides in permanent collections in MoMA, New York; The Israel Museum, Jerusalem; The Chase Manhattan Bank, New York; the National Archive, Smithsonian Institute, Washington, D.C.; Cooper Hewitt National Design Museum, New York and the Victoria and Albert Museum, London.

Milton has also received a long string of awards and accolades, including a National Design Award Lifetime Achievement from the Cooper-Hewitt National Design Museum. In 2009, he was awarded the National Medal of Arts by President Barack Obama.

If you feel that such grandeur and title based attributes are no match for relatable, memorable and empathetic works, just think of the I [heart] NY merchandise you see anywhere and everywhere. Yes, someone actually designed that. And while it is a beautiful part of our world just like the grass and the trees, it was forged by human hands and noted as ‘the most frequently imitated logo design in human history’. Glaser may be regarded in almost god-like omnipotence when it comes to design but like all of us he simply embarked on a journey and it’s that journey we’re interested in. How do you evolve from mere bodily fluids into a being that changes the shape of  it’s environment and the perceptions of the people around it?; maybe we can find out.

After the standard birth and education bit of life, Milton, as a graduate of New York’s Cooper Union for the Advancement of Science and Art and the Academy of Fine Arts in Bologna, founded the world famous Push Pin Studios with fellow graduates Seymour Chwast, Reynold Ruffins, and Edward Sorel. Part design and illustration studio, part pop culture think tank, Push Pin Studios made a phenomenal impact on visual culture from the 1950s to the 1980s, representing an important chapter in postwar graphic design. Its signature publication, The Push Pin Graphic had hundreds of memorable covers and spreads culled from each of the eighty-six inspired and imaginative issues confirming Push Pin’s vital role in setting the design curve and influencing the direction of modern visual style. The Push Pin Graphic is the first comprehensive account of a design milestone that continues to influence designers to this day. An exhibition of Push Pins work “The Push Pin Style” traveled to the Museum of Decorative Arts of the Louvre, as well as  cities in Europe, Brazil, and Japan in 1970–72. So ingredient number one in the recipe of design success, if we ignore all that ‘human-y’ stuff would be great educational accolades followed by founding a massively active, vibrant and eventually successful studio such as Push Pin. Surely this isn’t enough though, what’s next? Founding New York Magazine, that’s what. Experts have described the publication by saying;

“It became the model for city magazines, and stimulated a host of imitations.”

And who could argue?

Following this Milton along with his colleague Walter Bernard founded WBMG, the New York based publications company who’s work and client base is so extensive, the only way to express its magnitude it to paste the long list of most important works as stated by Glasers own website:
WBWG are responsible for the complete redesigns of three major newspapers: The Washington Post in the U.S., La Vanguardia in Barcelona, and O Globo in Rio de Janeiro. It has consulted on design projects for The Los Angeles Times, The Boston Globe, The Dallas Times Herald, The East Hampton Star, the New York Daily News and the National Post (Canada). Magazine clients in the United States include: Time, U.S. News & World Report, Adweek, Brill’s Content, Crain’s Chicago Business, Family Circle, Golf Digest, The Nation, Autoweek, Biography, USA Weekend, PC Magazine andWine Spectator. WBMG has created original prototype designs for Manhattan, Inc., Windows, The Journal of Art, and ESPN, the Magazine. In Europe, WBMG has developed and created the original format for Alma (a women’s service magazine) and Zeus (a cultural newspaper). The firm has redesigned L’Express, Lire (a French literary magazine), Jardin des Modes (women’s fashion), L’Espresso in Rome and Business Tokyo in Japan. WBMG has also designed the American Express Annual Report for three years, as well as several books, including Steve Salmieri’s Cadillac and Muhammad Ali: Memories for Rizzoli and ESPN’s SportsCentury for Hyperion. Walter and Milton are co-creators of “Our Times”, an illustrated history of the 20th century, published in 1995.

And finally, the most important chapter in Glaser’s career, the beginning of which is marked by the founding of Milton Glaser, inc. in 1974. Working under his own name has contributed toward his legendary status. Milton Glaser, inc. has produced works in almost all fields of design as well as some less expected fields such as environmental interior design, architectural design and product design. Glaser is noted as being personally responsible for a lot of the work put out by the company.

Glaser’s graphic and architectural commissions include the logo (which has been described as ‘the most frequently imitated logo design in human history’), commissioned by the state of New York in 1976; the design of a 600-foot mural for the New Federal Office Building in Indianapolis in 1974; the complete graphic and decorative programs for the restaurants in the World Trade Center, New York, as well as the design of the Observation Deck and Permanent Exhibition for the Twin Towers of the World Trade Center in 1975. He has also designed a number of architectural projects including Sesame Place, a children’s educational play park in Pennsylvania, 1981-83. For a period of fifteen years, Milton Glaser was involved with the re-design of a principal American supermarket chain, The Grand Union Company, a project that included all the company architecture, interiors, and packaging. He was responsible for the interior design and concept for the 1987-88 Triennale di Milano International Exhibition in Milan, Italy, on the theme of “World Cities and the Future of the Metropolis”. In 1987, Mr. Glaser was responsible for the graphic program of the Rainbow Room complexes for the Rockefeller Center Management Corporation, New York. Also in 1987, he designed the World Health Organization’s International AIDS Symbol and poster. From 1986–1989, he was responsible for the graphic design, theming, and signage for Franklin Mills, a retail mall in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania; and in 1988, he completed the exterior, interior, and all graphic elements of Trattoria dell’Arte, one of several New York restaurants he has designed. In 1990, Milton Glaser, Inc. was responsible for the overall conceptualisation and interior design of New York Unearthed, a museum located in Manhattan’s South Street Seaport. In 1993, he designed the logo for Tony Kushner’s Pulitzer Prize winning play, Angels in America. The list goes on and on.

You may have noticed, these articles are based on a survey titled ‘most influential designers working today’, a fact contributory to Glaser’s astounding career and performance. The very duration of his work and influence. Glaser still works today on massively high profile projects including Target Corp and Brooklyn Brewery, Milton, today is 84 years of age, still adding to his ever expanding portfolio of work spanning almost six decades.

TnaWhite-9960 theater-9598-6292 TFANA_logos-9417 sandiego_jazz-7786 poppyrecords-8679 platentofthetapes-3291 newyork_logo-3271 national_academy_ras-8075 lotusland-9678 iHeartNy-8744 esquire-2927 Dylan_poster_mk-9567 BrooklynBlogo-3704 BrooklynBadges-6799 Brooklyn-lager-bottle-2295 Brooklyn_bottlescase-7075 books_mag_plotamerica-9332 3rubin-7669-5855 7portes-9871 666-3531 2002_J_B_Parilux_small-3526 angelslogo-8773 anglesinamerica_drawing-5009 books_mag_humbling-8014

Next week is going to be a difficult one for me, David Carson. All will become apparent.

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Most influential designers; Paul Sahre http://d5media.co.uk/graphic-design/most-influential-designers-paul-sahre/ http://d5media.co.uk/graphic-design/most-influential-designers-paul-sahre/#comments Thu, 27 Jun 2013 14:36:02 +0000 http://d5media.co.uk/?p=10155 The D5 Graphic Design Blog This is the sixth part of a ten part blog series, if you’re looking to start from the beginning, go here. As part of their 50th anniversary survey GDUSA published a top ten list of the most influential graphic designers working today (amongst other creative professions). I’m going to work, in reverse order, through these top […]

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The D5 Graphic Design Blog
This is the sixth part of a ten part blog series, if you’re looking to start from the beginning, go here. As part of their 50th anniversary survey GDUSA published a top ten list of the most influential graphic designers working today (amongst other creative professions). I’m going to work, in reverse order, through these top ten designers and establish just what it is that makes them so damn great and more importantly display some of their best works.

#5 Paul Sahre

Sahre works regularly as a book cover artist and illustrator for the New York Times, however this does not stunt his client list which includes; Academy of American Poets, Sundance Channel,This American Life, The New School University, The School of Visual Arts,Soho Repertory Theatre, Times Square Alliance, Abrams, Marvel Comics, Knopf, Little Brown, Beacon Press, Vintage, Simon and Schuster, Scribner, Farrar Strauss and Giroux, Penguin Putnam, Aids Institute of New York, Not In Our Name,Verve Records, Luaka Bop, Newsweek, Time Magazine, New York Magazine, Good Magazine, Saturday Night Magazine, Metropolis Magazine Seed Magazine, Maclean’s Magazine, T Magazine, The New York Times Magazine, The Washington Post, Esquire Magazine, The Society of Publication Designers, among others.

Sahre is the sort of designer who’s work becomes one with it’s medium, a silent, unnoticed art if you will. Hundreds of images we consume and pass us by every day are designed, created, illustrated by guys like Paul Sahre. That book cover that jumps out at you on the tube, the weird images that appear next to articles in the paper and the pieces of design that have become one with their environment like stickers on street signs and comedic illustrations in novelty coffee table books.

It’s difficult to speak about Paul Sahre’s work without mentioning the sheer volume of it, since he established his Manhattan studio in ’97 above a Dunkin’ Donuts, he’s churned out hundreds upon hundreds of different pieces of work that feature on a vast array of platforms.

Sahre, like many of our influential designers, uses his skills to inspire and educate, teaching graphic design in New York City’s School of Visual Arts. Let’s take a look at some of his works:

UPCYCLE TMBG_APP times_NoBreathing_1 times_98_12_19_dummies times_06_03_20_letter TDC_annual roundabout_openend-2 PUBLIC_PAUL_SAHRE_POSTER OC_WEB nymag_winner NW_internationalsick-1 nuclearsecretshidden IMG_5750_Low illustration_FSGfish il_570xN.326852012 glob-all_a gladwell_collected-1 gilligan eyemonotlith deathbybookclub cover_dumped cover_chuckIV_paperback cards brochick baby_head AI_31_cover adobetook 1018OPEDoops-popup

 

You may be thinking: “Is this a top ten list of influential graphic designers who work out of New York?” Well, no it isn’t, but next week we have Milton Glaser, the guy who designed the famous I [heart] NY logo / t-shirts / every typical piece of memorabilia that’s sold kerbside in Manhattan. realising the risk of that sounding like a negative comment, I should mention; the mans a genius. Tune in next week.

 

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Bobo’s Beard at D&AD http://d5media.co.uk/animation/bobos-beard-at-dandad/ http://d5media.co.uk/animation/bobos-beard-at-dandad/#comments Wed, 26 Jun 2013 13:06:24 +0000 http://d5media.co.uk/?p=10144 As you may have noticed, we’ve been working relentlessly on an animation project currently being considered by the BBC. Next week, Bobo’s Beard is being exhibited in London at the D&AD New Blood festival, the project is in the running for ‘best in show’ so we’d like to encourage anyone to come down and show […]

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As you may have noticed, we’ve been working relentlessly on an animation project currently being considered by the BBC.

Next week, Bobo’s Beard is being exhibited in London at the D&AD New Blood festival, the project is in the running for ‘best in show’ so we’d like to encourage anyone to come down and show their support.

Bobos-Beard-Poster

“Step through the doors of London’s most exciting creative agencies and studios to find out what really goes on inside. From talks and tours, to screenings and pitches”

The huge design festival is open to the public on Wednesday the 3rd and Thursday the 4th of July, it features the best up and coming design and advertising work the country has to offer.

Bobo’s Beard is a story set in the beard of a roaming giant, 500 million years in the future. An entirely new animated, multi-language, children’s comedy- adventure series with firm moral foundations. It was created as part of a metadesign project. The characters, worlds and narrative are designed to emphasise the value of language, communication and open-mindedness. The unique way in which the story and characters were generated lay the way for something truly original. Rather than asking ‘How can we create a great kids TV show?’ Bobo’s Beard answers the question: ‘How can we use media to better our society?’ This fundamental idea has influenced an honest and genuine narrative based graphic output.  An opportunity to present the idea to CBBC is what encouraged the development and production of Bobo’s Beard. CBBC are currently considering the developed concept as well as some top secret on demand streaming services. We hope that the exposure at D&AD will assist the executives on the respective commissioning boards to make their decision. So please come along and show your support.

Visit the D&AD site for more information.

 

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Most influential designers; Michael Bierut http://d5media.co.uk/design/most-influential-designers-michael-bierut/ http://d5media.co.uk/design/most-influential-designers-michael-bierut/#comments Thu, 20 Jun 2013 10:50:43 +0000 http://d5media.co.uk/?p=10125 The D5 Graphic Design Blog This is the fifth part of a ten part blog series, if you’re looking to start from the beginning, go here. As part of their 50th anniversary survey GDUSA published a top ten list of the most influential graphic designers working today (amongst other creative professions). I’m going to work, in reverse order, through these top ten […]

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The D5 Graphic Design Blog
This is the fifth part of a ten part blog series, if you’re looking to start from the beginning, go here. As part of their 50th anniversary survey GDUSA published a top ten list of the most influential graphic designers working today (amongst other creative professions). I’m going to work, in reverse order, through these top ten designers and establish just what it is that makes them so damn great and more importantly display some of their best works.

#6 Michael Bierut

Like many graphic designers on the list, Bierut is on the receiving end of multiple awards and recognitions with over a hundred to his name, though reeling off a typical list of trophies isn’t the aim of these articles. We want to find out why and what lifted our best designers to the heights of success and hopefully, we can see this through their work.

Bierut himself accredits his achievements to pure passion and hard work, recalling that, in the early stages of his career at Vignelli he would tuck his wife in to bed after a long days work only to return, 3 blocks down, for the nights shift. A relentless stint that went on for four whole years.

Now a partner at most influential graphic design firm; Pentagram New York, Bierut has built up a client list including; Benetton, the Council of Fashion Designers of America, Alfred A. Knopf, the Walt Disney Company, Motorola, MillerCoors, Princeton University, Yale School of Architecture, New York University, the Library of Congress, the Museum of Sex, and the New York Jets.

He is also a design educator and serves as a senior critic in graphic design at the Yale School of Art, served more than a decade as the national president of the American Institue of Graphic Arts and is a co-editor of Design Observer.

Topically unfortunate; Michael Bierut has also accredited his design know-how to the HBO series, The Sopranos, who’s lead actor, James Gandolfini aka Tony Soprano sadly passed away yesterdayIn this article, he uses quotes from the hard-ass mafia family to support design arguments, the article again indicates Beirut’s relentlessness, logic, sensibilities and approach to design.

It would seem that Bierut has a sort of graphic design OCD, his partner at pentagram illustrates this by saying; “Michael has a brain that is a giant compendium,” Scher says. “He absorbs and retains everything and pulls it out at the appropriate moment and uses it to its maximal effect. Mention a movie and he quotes from it, maybe he enacts a little scene. Mention a book and he recites a passage and relates it to three other books that have the same spirit, that you haven’t read, but you will now. Mention a designer or architect and he knows the most recent project they’ve completed and their first project, how they’ve changed, how they haven’t, who influenced them, who they influence, and he sometimes will make a little sketch or diagram of their work. There isn’t a day that goes by when I haven’t asked Michael what he knows about anything and what he thinks about everything. If knowledge is power, then Michael Bierut is the most powerful person in the entire design community.”

Hard work and knowledge then are clear common themes in Bierut’s story so lets have a look at what you can achieve with these ‘powers’:

MD_BierutM_DesignCounts_640 MD_BierutM_LightYears_640 MD_BierutM_MatchBooks_640 MD_BierutM_NextWave95_640 MD_BierutM_NY_YSA_640 MD_BierutM_NYWTC_InfoSign_640 MD_BierutM_ProgArch_640 MD_BierutM_Tibor_640 MD_BierutM_United_Plane_640

Also, check out his opinions on graphic design and advertising in the 50′s and the introduction of helvetica and the international style.

Next week, Paul Sahre!

 

 

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Most influential designers; Charles S Anderson http://d5media.co.uk/design/graphic-designmost-influential-designers-shepard-fairey-2/ http://d5media.co.uk/design/graphic-designmost-influential-designers-shepard-fairey-2/#comments Fri, 14 Jun 2013 15:43:09 +0000 http://d5media.co.uk/?p=10074 The D5 Graphic Design Blog This is the fourth part of a ten part blog series, if you’re looking to start from the beginning, go here. As part of their 50th anniversary survey GDUSA published a top ten list of the most influential graphic designers working today (amongst other creative professions). I’m going to work, in reverse order, through these […]

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The D5 Graphic Design Blog
This is the fourth part of a ten part blog series, if you’re looking to start from the beginning, go here. As part of their 50th anniversary survey GDUSA published a top ten list of the most influential graphic designers working today (amongst other creative professions). I’m going to work, in reverse order, through these top ten designers and establish just what it is that makes them so damn great and more importantly display some of their best works.

#7 Charles S. Anderson

When Anderson describes his design philosophy, he talks about modernism and how it can be interpreted over-minimalistically resulting in sterile, uninteresting works. Instead, Charles S. Anderson Design Co. pride themselves on human-ized work, character and researched conceptual ideas. Not anti-modernist, nor post-modernist, simply a logical and justified interpretation of modernism.

We believe that truly great design is about making something that adds richness to people’s lives; something inspiring, memorable, funny, abrasive, ironic, elegant, ugly, human – anything but uninteresting.

These values, ideals and aesthetics shine through in their work. There’s almost always a humorous or human element present, an element that doesn’t distract from the purity or the message but adds to it, this balance, which they consistently achieve, is what elevates their work from great to inspiring.

Lets take a look…

wb_frog toulouse_poster tcm_pins tcm_makeready tcm_mainlogo tcm_logo4 tcm_logo3 tcm_logo2 tcm_logo1 tcm_letterhead tcm_heads tcm_cards poptone_roofull poptone_chimpfull poptone_camelfull paramountproducts_watches paramountproducts_plates1 paramountproducts_logo paramountproducts_globe paramountproducts_clock mr_french_logos illu_csaimages_mysterio3 illu_csaimages_mysterio2 illu_csaimages_mysterio1 illu_csaimages_mexink6 illu_csaimages_mexink5 illu_csaimages_mexink3 illu_csaimages_mexink1 illu_csaimages_archive2 fpc_paperdoll_2 fpc_paperdoll_1 fpc_logos fpc_inflatable fpc_inflatable_pack fpc_environmentalism fpc_environmentalism_back fpc_dogdisc fpc_butcher_2 fpc_butcher_1 fossil_logo book_illust aiga_designcamp

Charles S. Anderson’s client list includes:

  • French Paper
  • Nike
  • Target
  • Williams-Sonoma
  • Pottery Barn
  • Coca-Cola
  • Levi’s
  • Sony
  • American Eagle Outfitters
  • Ralph Lauren
  • Paramount Pictures
  • Nissan
  • The New York Times
  • Best Buy
  • Japanese Monster
  • Turner Classic Movies

It’s not difficult to see how Anderson made the list, next week, we’ll look at what makes Michael Bierut so damn great.

 

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